Tuesday, August 25, 2015

It is time to Register for Scott Owens' poetry class, The Stuff of Poetry, September 12, 2015

Scott Owens, Award winning poet, editor and teacher

September 12, 2015 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.     Fee: $35.00
Class description:
The Stuff of Poetry: This workshop will focus on creativity, originality, and imagery, answering the questions, "Where do we find the stuff for poetry?" "How do we know what to include?" and "How do we make it good?"

Participants should bring an object of "value" (something kept for years) with them, expect to generate several new ideas for writing, and expect to have their comfort zones challenged.


Scott Owens will read his poetry on Friday, 7:00 p.m. September 11, for Writers Night Out in Blairsville, GA.


Scott is originally from Greenwood, SC. He holds degrees from Ohio University, UNC Charlotte, and UNC Greensboro. He currently lives in Hickory, NC, where he teaches at Catawba Valley Community College, edits Wild Goose Poetry Review, owns and operates Taste Full Beans Coffeehouse and Gallery and serves as vice-president of the NC Poetry Society.
He is a Regional Representative of North Carolina Writers' Network, and Coordinator of Poetry Hickory. His 12th book of poetry, To, was released by Main Street Rag last year.

His work has received awards from the Academy of American Poets, the Pushcart Prize Anthology, the Next Generation/Indie Lit Awards, the NC Writers Network, the NC Poetry Society, and the Poetry Society of SC, and his articles about poetry have been featured in Poet’s Market twice.



Scott Owens
www.scottowenspoet.com                     www.ncpoetrysociety.org

To register, send check made to Glenda Beall. Mail to 581 Chatuge Lane, Hayesville, NC 28904
Copy registration form at top of page and include with your fee.

Monday, August 24, 2015

How to Write the Best Bio for your Guest Posts


We had the opportunity to learn from Tara Lynne Groth on Saturday so much about getting our names out there to the public, promoting our work online, and building the platform that will last. She talked about guest posting on blogs and how that enlarges your readership and builds your platform.


I have been writing bios for years, but this article tells us what is important to include. We need to put links, use humor when we can and find a way in a few words to get readers of your guest blog to go to your home page to see who you are and what you do.

This is a post I will copy and keep for my own records. Let me know if you read it and what you think.

Thanks for reading this blog and I appreciate your responses either in the comments section or by email: glendabeall@msn.com 

Friday, August 21, 2015

Let Me Help You Tell Your Story

We had a terrific course of writing at Tri-County Community College, Murphy, NC back in the spring. We will begin another series of four classes on Tuesday, September 1, 6:00 p.m.  This is a two hour class in the Community Enrichment Program once each week and everyone can be home before it is dark.

These are some of the dedicated writers from my spring class, 2015 at Tri-County Community College

I can tell we will be writing interesting and informative true life stories as we always do in these classes. My students get excited about sharing their work and hearing answers to their questions. 

We write to learn about ourselves as well as tell about our loved ones.  We find the writing of others will trigger a memory we had long forgotten, and I see students grabbing pens to jot down those memories before they slip away like a wisp of smoke. That is what can happen to memories if you don't write them down.

I hope, if you have thought about taking a class on writing true life stories (non-fiction) about yourself, your family, your experiences, your war stories, your college stories, your stories that you want to tell someone, maybe your family and friends, or just to write because it is fun,  this is the class to take.

or call Tri-County Community College in Murphy, NC (828) 835-4241 and ask for Lisa in the Community Enrichment Program.
Email her at: lthompson@tricountycc.edu 
She will explain registration procedure.

Monday, August 17, 2015

The Editors Blog has a cheat sheet for you.

I saw this article on The Editors Blog and I want to share it with everyone. Visit the link below or just google The Editors Blog. What are compound words and how do we use compound words? How do we write them? This blog offers a Cheat Sheet for those of us who struggle with "when to hyphenate" those words and when we do not.

http://theeditorsblog.net/2015/08/15/compound-words-using-this-cheat-sheet-is-not-cheating/

Monday, August 10, 2015

Don't Double Space at the End of a Sentence - here's why.

If you are a writer who still double spaces after a period, please read this post by Alice Osborn. 


In my classes I always find writers who learned in typing class to double space at the end of every sentence, but today in the computer world, we use only one space. I am asked why the change.
Alice, in a light-hearted, humorous way explains why. Check out her blog for many good tips on writing. 

Saturday, August 1, 2015

What do I need to know to change from writing nonfiction to fiction?


I am a fan of Bobbie Christmas, editor of Zebra Communications, and author of excellent books on the writing craft. In one of Bobbie's newsletters she answered a question by a reader. She has given me permission to post that exchange here on Writers Circle around the Table. Thank you, Bobbie.



From newsletter by Bobbie Christmas
Q: I've been a freelance writer for magazines and newspapers for many
years, but I have a novel in my head, begging me to write it. I'm not
sure I can successfully switch from writing nonfiction to writing
fiction. What are some of the things I need to know?

A: Quick answer: everything.

Let me explain. I worked with newspapers and magazines for the first
twenty years of my writing and editing career, so I thought I knew
enough to write a novel. Boy, was I wrong! The best thing I did was
join a critique circle for novelists, and I quickly saw that I knew
almost nothing about how to write fiction. I knew a great deal about
how to form a strong sentence; I knew grammar, and I thought I knew
punctuation. Quickly I learned, however, that I had been using
punctuation, capitalization, and abbreviations standard in AP style,
whereas novels and nonfiction books call for Chicago style.

As a gift, my son gave me a copy of The Chicago Manual of Style, and I
went into overwhelm, because of the volume of the book. I didn't think
I could learn it all. I soon realized that I did not have to learn
everything, but I did need to look up specific things, when I wasn't
sure.

Members of my critique circle had been writing fiction much longer than
I had. I could help them when it came to grammar and strong sentence
structure, but they helped me tremendously with details of Chicago
style as well as the many elements of fiction. They made me aware of
point of view, setting scenes, scene changes, character development,
plot development, exposition, backstory, flashbacks, and much more that
I had never encountered as a writer and editor of newspaper and
magazine articles.

Go ahead and begin writing your novel, but find a good critique group
that concentrates on novels and get feedback and information from
members more knowledgeable in writing fiction.

In addition, pay attention while you read your favorite novelists and
see how they handle openings, chapters, flashbacks, backstory,
exposition, dialogue, scenes, character development, plot evolution,
climax, and denouement.

I also offer a lengthy free report on some of the differences between
AP style and Chicago style. It has good information for anybody not yet
fully familiar with Chicago style. Ask for Report #118 by e-mail
(Bobbie@zebraeditor.com), and I'll send it right away.

The switch from nonfiction to fiction isn't simple, but if your heart
is in writing a novel, you will enjoy entering a whole new world of
writing.    

(Bold fonts in post are mine. Glenda Beall)




Bobbie Christmas

Author of Write In Style: How to Use Your Computer to Improve Your Writing 

(To learn more, click here: http://tinyurl.com/o4trud2 )

Owner, Zebra Communications 
Excellent editing for maximum marketability

Coordinator, FWA Editors Helping Writers

230 Deerchase Drive, Woodstock, GA 30188

(1)770-924-0528 


Sign up for The Writers Network News, my free newsletter for writers, at www.zebraeditor.com.