Showing posts with label Carol Crawford. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Carol Crawford. Show all posts

Friday, September 25, 2020

Sorry if you missed the dialogue class on Zoom today. Carol Crawford taught her first Zoom workshop and her students, including me, had an informative two hours with an editor who knows her stuff.

We hope to have Carol teach again in a few months. As we hunker down this winter, would you like to experience an excellent writing class with a well published writer, editor and poet? Let me know what you are interested in learning more about.

If you are an instructor of poetry or prose with a resume', please email and let's get to know each other. 

We are not offering classes or workshops in Writers Circle around the Table, the actual studio, because of COVID and some other problems, but we can continue bringing writers the best writing teachers by using Zoom online. 

Thanks to Carol Crawford and those who attended today.

Monday, August 24, 2020

PANDEMIC DISCOUNT ON THE WRITING DIALOGUE WITH CAROL CRAWFORD SEPTEMBER 24

CAROL CRAWFORD


On Thursday, September 24, 2 - 4 PMCarol Crawford, published writer and editor, will teach a class via Zoom for those who want to improve their writing of dialogue.

Bring your characters to life with dialogue that is authentic, clear, and compelling. Capture the flavor of personality and culture through speech that sounds real. In-class exercises will cover word choice, tone, action beats, what to leave out, and format in this interactive workshop. 
Register no later than September 19. 


Email gcbmountaingirl@gmail.com to receive instructions for registration.

Fee - $25

Sponsored by NCWN-West and Writers Circle around the Table.


Saturday, April 6, 2019

Can you make it without an MFA? Thomas Mullen did.

Twelve years after my first book deal, I’m happy to report that no editor has ever asked me if I have an MFA. What matters to publishers is the book you write, not the path you took to get there. ... Thomas Mullen

For the first time I missed going to the Blue Ridge Writers' Conference in Blue Ridge, Georgia. I had sent my application and definitely planned to go, but going down to south Georgia last week played havoc with my physical and mental health. I just could not get myself up to spend the day at the conference. I am an INFJ on the personality chart, so I know why I don't want to see anyone or talk to anyone right now.

My friend, Carol Crawford, who was instigator of this wonderful small conference over twenty years ago, sent me an email and a message about Thomas Mullen who was a presenter there today.

I am giving you this link to a great article he wrote for Poets and Writers.
http://www.thomasmullen.net/making-it-without-an-mfa

I know many writers who, like me, did not get that MFA and always wonder if that would have made a big difference in their writing career, will find solace in Thomas' words on this subject. I did not meet him, but, after reading this piece, wish I had.

Monday, August 13, 2018

Setting Writers on the Right Track



Anne Bowman, Terri Thrower, Carol Gladders, Caroll Taylor, Nancy Meyers Lisa Long
Back: Richard Cary and Don Long
Sitting in front, instructor: Glenda beall
TCCC Publishing and Marketing Class August 11, 2018


Carol Crawford presented a power point program on what a writer needs to know when preparing a manuscript for publication.
Glenda Beall discussed the importance of marketing before publishing, places to submit poetry and prose as well as online methods of marketing.

 

Saturday, July 14, 2018

These writers came to Carol Crawford's workshop today

Photo by Carol Crawford
It is a joy to take a class with Carol Crawford and to have her come to my studio is even better. The photo above was taken today, Saturday, at Writers Circle around the Table.
 From left is Anne Bowman, Carol Gladders, Me, Diane Payne on the far end, Jerry Stripling, Nancy Meyers and Ayer Gresham. All of these people have taken my classes at my studio. They said they enjoy coming and getting to know other writers as well as learning.

Carol's workshop was fun and full of good information. She gave us writing assignments to do in class that helped us get away from the cliché and made us think of the best way to describe someone without the every day "drivers license" description--five feet, two inches tall, with black hair.

photo by Glenda Beall
Carol is standing at the far end of the table by the board. 


The writing assignment spurred me on to write about a family member. This often happens in workshops. We find that we become motivated to write, to get those words on paper now. Some of my best poems have come to light in a poetry class.
Isn't that what we want, to be inspired to write? 
 
 

 NEW CLASS COMING UP
 
I decided I could work in another six week course at the studio beginning on August 14. We will meet Tuesday afternoons, 2 - 5 PM. This creative writing course is 18 hours of class time. We write something fresh and new each week and we share it with our classmates. We are taking registration now.
 
Contact me at gcbmountaingirl@gmail.com if you want to register and I will give you information for sending a check.
 
Visit www.glendacouncilbeall.com and click on the Studio Schedule page for a class description.
 

Friday, March 17, 2017

What's Happening? This is happening.

Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor for the Writer’s Digest Writing Community. He offers good info for poets who follow him on Twitter or Facebook and who read his blog. http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/poetic-asides


Robert was a guest at Writers Circle around the Table a few years ago, and I have followed him online since then. He is a very nice man, a father and husband, and gives many tips and ideas for poetry on his blog. He generously helps budding poets, and is accessible by email. You will gain good ideas from him. He travels to talk to writing groups, large and small. 

I met him at the Blue Ridge Writers' Conference in Blue Ridge, GA where my friend, Carol Crawford, invited him to speak. And speaking of a wonderful writing event, the Blue Ridge Writers' Conference will be April 7 and 8 in Blue Ridge GA. It is one of the best small conferences I have ever attended. 

Mark your calendar now for this important day in May.

Writers, poets, playwrights and anyone who wants to publish fiction, nonfiction, or poetry will receive advice, tips and motivation at A Day for Writers, a one day conference in Sylva, NC on Saturday, May 6. You will find information about this conference at www.netwestwriters.blogspot.com  
This gathering is sponsored by the Jackson County Public Library and the NC Writers' Network-West. We will meet at the library in the old courthouse, a lovely place. 

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Writers Circle will Continue into November

Carol Crawford
We had a week full of good instruction for writers at Writers Circle around the Table. Carol Crawford, poet, writer and editor had us writing and creating an essay that we hope to have ready for submitting this coming Thursday when she will hold the second session of this workshop.


Carol has taught writing for years and is a favorite instructor at the John C. Campbell Folk School and here at Writers Circle. Carol has been coordinating the annual Blue Ridge Writers' Conference in Blue Ridge Georgia for many years. It has become one of the best conferences and I was thrilled to be on the faculty last year. 

Scott Owens, who teaches every year at Writers Circle, was one of the instructors at the Blue Ridge conference a couple of years ago. His poetry workshop Saturday here at my studio inspired seven poets who, I'm sure, went home filled with more ideas for poems than they could have imagined if they had not been present.
Scott Owens, poet

Several poets, as they were leaving, praised Scott and said this was one of the best workshops they have attended. After five years, I am fortunate to have been able to interest good writers like Scott and Carol in coming to Writers Circle. And our local attendees have expressed their gratitude to me for bringing in high caliber artists and for keeping the fees reasonable. As long as I can make enough to keep the lights on and keep the doors open as well as pay our instructors a decent honorarium for their work, I will continue as we have been doing. 

I owe much of the  success of Writers Circle to my volunteer work with NCWN West. For several years I wrote articles about writers for the newspapers as part of my publicity duties.  I met many peopole around our region just by talking to them on the  phone. In 2007 I  became the Program Coordinator for Netwest. I attended the Spring and Fall Conferences and met members of the literary community from all across the state. I began the Netwest Writers blog in 2007 which enlarged our circle even more. 

My husband was diagnosed with cancer in 2008, and I had to  curtail my duties with Netwest. When he died in 2009, I resigned. Overcome with grief and exhaustion of care-giving, I knew it would be impossible for me to continue to do what needed to be done as program coordinator. 

In 2010, needing to do something useful and helpful to others, I started Writers Circle downstairs in my house. We had outstanding writers like Maureen Ryan Griffin stay overnight in my guest room and teach a Saturday morning class. Maureen's successful WordPlay classes are well-known, and she teaches at John C. Campbell Folk School in their writing program each year. She gave me advice and was willing to help me get my business off the ground. I am forever indebted to her. 

The past five years have been filled with writing time, classes in writing, discussions with authors and enjoyment of having friends feel at home sitting around the table in my studio. I am never happier than being with writers and talking about writing. 


Monday, August 25, 2014

New class begins September 11 with Carol Crawford

Thursdays, September 11 and September 18, 10 - 1:00 p.m.
Fee: $30
Your Next Submission:  Write it, Fix it, Send it!
In this two-session class you will complete a nonfiction story of at least 1000 words.  In the first session you will write a 200-word story idea and a 500-word dialogue exercise.  You will plan your scenes for the rest of the story and look at ways to increase the story’s audience reach.  The second session will be devoted to group critique and a discussion of research, finishing and revision guidelines.  Students should come to the second class with a finished, revised story and a target market.   

Carol Crawford is a writer, poet and editor. She is Program Coordinator for the annual Blue Ridge Writers' Conference in Blue Ridge, GA. Her work is widely published in literary journals. Her business is Carol Crawford Editing.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Do You have to be High Tech to Build a Brand?

What a great time I had at the Blue Ridge Writers' Conference in Blue Ridge Georgia. Carol Crawford and her staff including Caroline Mann make it seem effortless to host over 80 people all day long and move them from room to room as needed, keep all the presenters moving toward their posts, and feed them lunch.
Glenda B. and Carol Crawford   

Although I was deliberately late, needing to pace myself for energy, and because I had suffered from the overload of fragrance at the reception on Friday night, the day was quite long for me. 

Eager writers filled almost every seat in the room for my 11:00 a.m. session waiting to learn something that would help them to become published writers. Even now, at my age and with my experience, I am still honored and pleased when others look to me for expertise. I was there to help all the wanna-be writers and those who considered themselves writers already, but needed a boost to get their name out there, to be known to the readers they want to reach. 

I have been going to this conference for seventeen years. Never missed one. I know who attends this event in the beautiful little tourist town in the North Georgia mountains. I have walked in their shoes and know what they want to know. I know that most of them are not into high tech marketing. 

I asked how many had a website and then how many had a blog. As I expected, a few hands shot into the air. Many of the folks in the room were over fifty. I relaxed and felt right at home. These were my people. 

We talked about building relationships with readers, building a name as a writer at home in our own community and I told them the many ways I had done that before finding the Internet in 2007. 

In another room a professional writer with a movie contract and ten novels to her name explained her method of building her career - Facebook and Twitter mostly - it seemed. I suggested to my group that they set up a free blog and "dip their toe into the water of the web." I did this because I know that most of them are scared to death of jumping into cyberspace in the way many do today to promote yourself and your work.

I like blogs because the writer has the opportunity to show her writing ability, show her readers who she is, what she likes, and what she expects and wants people to think about her. My theory is that a writer must first think about her readers and give them some reason to choose her words over others, to buy her book if she has one. I have favorite authors who blog and I like to know them through these weekly posts. I had some author's blogs I followed and enjoyed until those authors decided to go to FB and Twitter and leave their blogs. Now I don't follow them.

It is just not the same on FB or Twitter. If one is a famous author, he has a staff that plops up promotion material for him or he tells where he will appear next week. But an author, like our own Vicki Lane, author of The Elizabeth Goodweather Appalachian Mysteries from Bantam Dell keeps her readers with her every step as she writes and publishes her next book. We read her blog and we know the ups and downs she faces just as we do. We learn to care about her as a regular person as well as the author of the series. We worried about her when she had a car accident recently.

This quote from Seth Godin says what I think about depending on Twitter to build your writing platform.
How many eyeballs are passing by is a useless measure. All that matters is,
"how many people want to hear from you tomorrow?"

I had planned to go on with more information on building a brand, but our 45 minutes flew by once the audience became interactive with the discussion of blogging. I will be most interested to see if anyone there will set up a blog and I hope, if they do, they will let me know. 

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Journal of Kentucky Studies

Years ago, when I was beginning to submit poetry for publication, Carol Crawford told me to try the Journal of Kentucky Studies, published by  Northern Kentucky University
Picture
Carol Crawford
She had met an editor at Appalachian Heritage who said he would soon be an editor there. He had invited her to send some poems and she suggested I do the same.

I have always admired Carol's work so I followed her advice and was overjoyed when one of my poems appeared across the page from Carol's in this nice book.

Dr. Gary Walton is the editor for Journal of Kentucky Studies. 
Their writing program has evidently grown quite a bit since those days when they published several of my poems. I visited the site and I see they have a good creative writing program. In fact, the editor of my chapbook, Now Might as Well be Then, Leah Maines at Finishing Line Press, is listed among their faculty.

I read their English Department blog and found this post that might be of interest to my readers. One of the college's alums is an older woman, Mary Anne Reese, who went back to school after years of working as an attorney. She lives in Cincinnati, OH, and earned her MA at Northern Kentucky University. She gives some good advice, I think.
http://nkuenglish.wordpress.com/2013/10/21/alum-feature-mary-anne-reese/

Friday, June 21, 2013

We have Carol Crawford to help us with our memoir, essay, short story

Carol Crawford, writer and poet, mother and wife,
Director of the Blue Ridge Writers Conference, will teach at Writers Circle on July 9, 2:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.
I hope all of you within driving distance of Writers Circle in Hayesville, NC will take the opportunity to be with us when Carol Crawford teaches a class for prose writers, fiction and non-fiction, that will help us prepare our manuscript for submitting to a journal or anthology, and that will give our work the best chance to be selected for publication.

Big Picture Revision
Never mind the commas – there are often bigger things to think about when you finish a first draft and begin the work of revision.  
In this workshop we will take a piece you have written and look at it with fresh eyes, finding its natural trajectory and structure.  We will clarify what’s confusing and emphasize what’s strong, so that you can write the story you want to write. 
"Please bring a short (1000 word) essay, story or excerpt for us to work on during the class."

 Carol's essays, fiction and poetry have been published in the Concho River Review, the Chattahoochee Review, the Southern Humanities Review, the Journal of Appalachian Studies, and others.  She is director of FLAG Adult Education and volunteer coordinator for the annual Blue Ridge Writers' Conference.  Carol is a graduate of Baylor University, and a native of Texas, but she lives in the north Georgia mountains now.

This is our first time to have Carol teach at Writers Circle, but I hope it won't be the last. While we seem to have a large number of poets as instructors, we want to also hold classes for non-poets or those, like me, who write both poetry and prose.

Register by calling 828-389-4441 to reserve your place, or mail your check for $30.00 to Writers Circle 581 Chatuge Lane, Hayesville, NC 28904


Friday, March 29, 2013

Senior Friends has a website and pictures of Carol and me.

I discovered quite by accident that Senior Friends where Carol Crawford and I spoke on March 21 has a nice site.

You can see what a busy group they are and see photos of Carol and me here.
The candid shot of me at the podium shows me licking my lips, a habit I don't notice usually.


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