Showing posts with label book promotion. Show all posts
Showing posts with label book promotion. Show all posts

Friday, November 6, 2015

Advice for Using Social Media to Promote Yourself and Your Books

Recently Writers Circle hosted Tara Lynne Groth who taught a three hour course in Hayesville, NC on marketing and publishing.

Some of those present were lost in the social media language,  and I realized how many of our mature writers in our area who have written good books that are available for purchase are stymied because of their lack of Internet skills and, especially, social media skills. 

Below is a short article from WritersMarket.com by Penny Sansevieri who has a background in marketing and writing books on this subject.

I am happy to see that she doesn't recommend you try to be on all the Social Media that is available now.



"First off, authors should view the Internet as one big networking party and much like a networking event you want to seek out people who you have a common interest with and who will be interested in your work. 

When it comes to social networking sites my suggestion always is: less is more. A lot of authors want to do all of it--by "all" I mean a lot of social networking sites, etc. Really overextending themselves. I don't recommend this.

Once you are on these sites stay active, you don't want to look like you've abandoned the site or your work and it's easier to stay active if you're not on 35 different sites."


Tara Lynn Groth caught my attention when she said, "If you have an account and you never go there, people will think you died or quit writing."

Penny says, "Next, lead with helpful information. You should never start your Internet marketing campaign saying: please buy my book. But you should start it by saying "how can I help you" this will get you much further online. 

Engage, network, entertain, enlighten and always, always, stay active and be helpful."


This is the same advice I give to those who ask me, "How can I get people to buy my book?"

First, the reader needs to have a good reason to buy your book. If he knows nothing about you as a writer or a person, why should he fork over his money for your book? That helps you, but what does it do for him?

C. Hope Clark says the author needs to build a fan base. Like a TV celebrity or movie actor, the author should work on building a group of people who like her, who like her books and will recommend them to others. She also says an author needs a website. The first thing people do when they want to know who you are is google your name.


The Internet is a great tool if used properly. But writers must be careful they don't come across in a way that alienates the very people they hope will read their books. I get turned off if an author is extremely political on Facebook, especially if I disagree with their politics. Why post all the wild and crazy political verbiage you find online? Talk about yourself, your likes and what makes you unhappy. Talk about your writing schedule, where you like to write and what time of day. Discuss your travels and research as author Deanna Klingel does.

Be aware that whatever you post on FB or Twitter is the same as writing a letter to the people you want to read your books. Tell them what you want to say and do so in a way that makes them come back to hear what you will say next. 

I find that I have the greatest number of comments when I write about my dog, post a photo of her and me. Those people relate to me because I love dogs and so do they. 

My blog, Writing Life Stories, is popular with people who have families and want to write about them whether as genealogists or the desire to leave a written legacy. I share my personal life, my family stories, and family history on this blog, and then I share it with Face Book. I have some readers who say when they see my blog post in their Inbox, that is the first thing they open. 

Show your generous side. Give and share information that helps others, things you have learned along the way. As you share with the world, they will like you as a person or they will not. Don't be afraid to praise other writers, help them promote their books by giving them a lift on your page. They will, in turn, do the same for you. But, if they don't, your readers will be impressed that you are generous and helpful to others. Your readers want to know what kind of person you really are.




Penny Sansevieri has taught extensively on publishing and book marketing.  As CEO and founder of Author Marketing Experts (www.authormarketingexperts.com), Penny’s been in business for over 10 years and her firm specializes in organic Internet marketing.

Monday, September 7, 2015

How Leadership Helps You as a Writer - Seven Tips

Leaders become influencers. Leaders pave the way for themselves and others.


If you are a writer, it is likely you don’t want the limelight. You work best in the quiet of your own space. You don’t need people around and you don’t want to be bothered. You are happy working on your book – whatever it may be.
But eventually you have to think about what you will do when the book is finished, published or ready to be read by the public. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could just mail the manuscript to someone who would take over and print it, promote it, sell it, and send you a big fat check each month? You could just write and write and never leave the house.

I see many writers who believe that is the life of an author. Sadly, that's one of the myths the public has believed for years. In today’s world the author must be seen and heard. The author is the one who markets his/her book.

Painless methods an author can use to reach an audience. Take on a role of leadership. Don’t volunteer for more than you feel comfortable doing, but try the following suggestions.


  1. If there is a writing organization in your town or area, join and attend the events. If you don't feel you will gain any new knowledge, you will likely be surprised. You can offer encouragement and good advice. People will remember how you make them feel.
  2. Find ways you can serve the organization – lead a critique group, become the helper to the leader, and if there is no job, make one, then do it.
  3. Offer to do the publicity for your writing group. Write articles about the members and publish them in the local newspapers with your name listed as guest writer. Be the one to put your local literary group on the map. Use photos with each article.
  4. Join your state literary group. Connect with the leadership and staff. Call or email and tell them that you appreciate their work for members. 
  5. Become a mentor for beginning writers. Don’t fear being unprepared. If you have been writing long enough to complete a book manuscript, you know more than a fledgling wanna-be poet or writer.  
  6. Hold an open mic event in a local coffee shop or book store once a month. Write an article for the local newspapers about who attends and who reads, and be sure to write about the event on social media. 
  7. Promote other writers and poets on social media. Be generous with your appreciation and congratulations to writers you know. Send notes or emails when you hear of someone's successes. Write to authors and tell them how much you enjoy their books or stories you have read. In your signature on your email, be sure to list your position with your organization.


Karen Paul Holmes joined NCWN West after taking a poetry class taught by Nancy Simpson, original leader of NCWN West.

 Karen Paul Holmes now leads Writers Night Out, another writing group in Atlanta, and serves writers in North Georgia as NCWN representative. She is also a member of the Georgia Poetry Society. She schedules readings throughout the mountains and in Atlanta. Her first poetry book, Untying the Knot, was recently published, and the book is getting much-deserved attention. 

Karen connected with poets on Social Media who then offered to interview her and promote her book through their blogs and websites. Through NCWN Karen networked with other influential writers, too. Karen promotes other poets and supports literary organizations online. She is a perfect example of what I am writing about today. 

Writers today must build a reputation with the public in order to build a readership for their work. 

Monday, September 22, 2014

Take Advantage of Leadership - Read These 7 Tips

If you are a writer, it is likely you don’t want the limelight. You work best in the quiet of your own space. You don’t need people around and you don’t want to be bothered. You are happy working on your book – whatever it may be.

But eventually you have to think about what you will do when the book is finished, published or ready to be read by the public. Wouldn't it be nice if you could just mail the manuscript to someone who would take over and print it, promote it, sell it, and send you a big fat check each month? You could just write and write and never leave the house.

I see many writers who seem to think that is the life of an author. Sadly, that is one of the myths the public has believed for years. In today’s world the author must be seen and heard. The author is the one who markets his/her book.

I want to suggest some painless methods an author can use to reach an audience. Take on a role of leadership. Don’t volunteer for more than you feel comfortable doing, but try the following suggestions.
  1. If there is a writing organization in your town or area, join and attend the events.
  2. Find ways you can help the organization – lead a critique group, become the helper to the leader, and if there is no job, make one that you want to do, then do it.
  3. Offer to do the publicity for your writing group. Write articles on the members and publish them in the local newspapers with your name listed as the writer. Be the one to put your local literary group on the map. Use photos with each article.
  4. Join your state literary group. Know the leaders and call them or email them with suggestions of how they might best serve their members. Better—call or email and tell them what a great job they are doing for the members.
  5. Become a mentor for beginning writers. 
  6. Hold an open mic event in a local coffee shop or book store once a month. Write an article for the local newspapers about who attends and who reads, and be sure the event is on social media with your name attached.
  7. As soon as you feel you are ready, volunteer for a major leadership position in a literary organization. When your name is well-recognized, your book will soon follow. Be sure you make as many speeches or appear at as many events as possible where you can mention your book. 
Tell me what you think of these ideas. Do you think they would help you?

Monday, November 11, 2013

Writing is the easy part - now sell those books

 Follow These Five Rules to Prepare for Your Book Launch

1. Six months before the book is released, create a written marketing plan

2. Send out notices about your book acceptance to everyone on your email list, your Facebook and Twitter contacts as well. 
This is an announcement, not a pitch to sell the book. Not yet.

3. Call and set up book signings or readings, one a week for three months. The library or book store is not always the best place to hold a signing. I signed a book about horses in a farm supply and feed company. Advertise the events in local newspapers. Create interest in yourself. Include your photo if possible. 

4. Locate book clubs and make dates to visit them in person or by phone or skype. This can often be done from your own home.
If your book fits in a special niche, find those people through support groups, church groups, or social clubs, and make arrangements to give a free author chat, or give away several of your books each time you appear. One might be hesitate to give away his book, but consider this as cost of advertising. Word of mouth is the best kind of promotion, especially when it comes from one who has read and enjoyed the book

5. Guest blog for another blogger. Write short articles for your favorite charity, send to your local newspaper. If you have a cause you are passionate about, get your name out there by writing about this cause but don't write about something that will divide your audience. 

Monday, September 9, 2013

Free books and a new anthology

FutureCycle Press, a nonprofit publisher of poetry and flash fiction offers free books as promotions. See more at the link below.

http://www.futurecycle.org/PromotionsTab.aspx


Their new anthology based on the theme Malala and education for girls and women will be available soon.

Friday, June 28, 2013

Author Events - What Do We Want?

Have you published a novel or memoir or non-fiction book?
Do you want to promote your book to the public? 

This article on NCWN blog is excellent concerning author presentations whether in book stores or other venues.
My favorite is the author talks where there is interchange between the writer and the audience, similar to what Deanna Klingel did at John Campbell folk school Thursday night.


Read the above article and go on to read the original post (follow the link at the end of the article) and tell us what you think?
What do you want when you go to hear and see an author? 

Featured Post

Bad Writing Habits?