Showing posts with label Finishing Line Press. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Finishing Line Press. Show all posts

Friday, July 10, 2020

Not out of Print - find it here

https://www.finishinglinepress.com/product/now-might-as-well-be-then-by-glenda-council-beall/



A poem from Now Might as Well be Then

                                               
                        A Very Old Photograph
                         by
                             Glenda Council Beall 
Shy with the camera,
she stands in her white sailor dress
one arm behind her back.
Her dark eyes, so much like mine,
glance right. Her lips almost smile.

I wish I had known her then.
We’d have been friends,
going to pound suppers, singing
alto in the church choir.
She was loved as I was loved,
sheltered by Mama, strengthened
by her Papa’s expectations.

How could she have imagined ageing?
Certainly not at fourteen
and looking so lovely.
She never thought she’d grow old,
lose her memory, and depend on me,
her daughter, to care for her.
                          


From Now Might As Well Be Then (Finishing Line Press, 2009)

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Article by Lucy Gratton - Rice and Beall read at JCCFS

JOHN CAMPBELL FOLK SCHOOL
              On Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 7:00 PM, John Campbell Folk School and N.C. Writers Network West are sponsoring The Literary Hour, an hour of poetry and prose reading held at Keith House on the JCFS campus. This is being held on the third Thursday of the month unless otherwise notified.  The reading is free of charge and open to the public.  Writers Estelle Rice and Glenda Beall will be the featured readers, both of whom are well established poets in the mountain area. 
    
ESTELLE RICE

Estelle Rice, author of Quiet Times, a book of poetry, is a well-published writer whose short stories have appeared in The Appalachian Heritage Journal, the Journal of Kentucky Studies, and in anthologies and magazines, including Lights in the Mountains and Echoes Across the Blue Ridge.

She is a native North Carolinian, born in Rock y Mount and raised in Charlotte. She now lives in Marble, NC. Estelle received her BA in psychology from Queens University in Charlotte and a MA in counseling from the University of South Alabama. She is a retired Licensed Professional Counselor. Although she is a full-time caregiver for her husband now, she still attends writing workshops and continues to create poems and stories. Her poetry has been published in The Back Porch, the Freeing Jonah series and others.
Estelle has been a member of  the North Carolina Writers’ Network West for many years and has endeared herself to her friends and co-writers alike.


GLENDA BEALL

Glenda Beall’s poems, essays and short stories have been published in numerous literary journals and magazines including, Reunions Magazine, Main Street Rag, Appalachian Heritage, Muscadine Lines: A Southern Journal, The Dead Mule, School of Southern Literature and Wild Goose Poetry Review. Her poems have been anthologized in Lights in the Mountains, The Best of Poetry Hickory Series, 2011, Kakalak: North Carolina Poets of 2009, and Women’s Spaces, Women’s Places, among others.

Glenda enjoys writing articles for newspapers on subjects that are important to her such as indoor air pollution and spaying and neutering pets. She supports animal rescue shelters with her articles. She  taught memoir writing at John C. Campbell Folk School for several years. She also teaches writing at Tri-County Community College.

Glenda served as program director of North Carolina Writers’ Network West in 2007 and 2008, and is now Clay County Representative for NCWN West.  Glenda is author of  NOW MIGHT AS WELL BE THEN, poetry published by Finishing Line Press, and she compiled a family history,  PROFILES AND PEDIGREES, THOMAS CHARLES COUNCIL AND HIS DESCENDANTS, published by Genealogy Publishing Company.

Glenda is Owner/Director of Writers Circle where she invites those interested in writing poetry or prose to her home studio for classes taught by some of the best poets and writers in the area.  Find her online at
www.glendacouncilbeall.blogspot.com and www.profilesandpedigrees.blogspot.com







Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Good News for Abbie Johnson Taylor

We are happy to learn that one of our most loyal readers, Abbie Johnson Taylor, will soon have a poetry book published by Finishing Line Press.

That’s Life: New and Selected Poems, includes a poem about her wedding day. Little did she know on that lovely day, her husband would suffer a stroke within months, and she would become a 24/7 caregiver until his death six years later.

See part of one of her poems below:

Life Change

On a sunny day, a strong breeze

lifts hems of dresses.

Balloons, tree branches sway.

Framed by an arch of pink and purple flowers,

as traffic rushes by,

we stand before those we love,

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Journal of Kentucky Studies

Years ago, when I was beginning to submit poetry for publication, Carol Crawford told me to try the Journal of Kentucky Studies, published by  Northern Kentucky University
Picture
Carol Crawford
She had met an editor at Appalachian Heritage who said he would soon be an editor there. He had invited her to send some poems and she suggested I do the same.

I have always admired Carol's work so I followed her advice and was overjoyed when one of my poems appeared across the page from Carol's in this nice book.

Dr. Gary Walton is the editor for Journal of Kentucky Studies. 
Their writing program has evidently grown quite a bit since those days when they published several of my poems. I visited the site and I see they have a good creative writing program. In fact, the editor of my chapbook, Now Might as Well be Then, Leah Maines at Finishing Line Press, is listed among their faculty.

I read their English Department blog and found this post that might be of interest to my readers. One of the college's alums is an older woman, Mary Anne Reese, who went back to school after years of working as an attorney. She lives in Cincinnati, OH, and earned her MA at Northern Kentucky University. She gives some good advice, I think.
http://nkuenglish.wordpress.com/2013/10/21/alum-feature-mary-anne-reese/

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Karen Holmes, Kelsay Books, Poetry Collections

My friend, Karen Holmes, is a terrific poet. Her poetry collection Untying the Knot, will be published next year by Kelsay Books.

This is an excerpt from an interview with Karen Kelsay of Kelsay Books. I post this to reiterate what I tell my students and to guide you to read this post:


Yes, there have been a few I really thought were well written and clever, but they just didn't follow the guidelines closely enough. I absolutely hate to do layout work on experimental poetry. The lines need to be justified to the left and in a traditional manner. I will let a few slip by if they look like they won’t be too much trouble, but I will refuse the manuscript if it is filled with crazy lines going all over the place.


I am in process of putting together a poetry manuscript that I hope will be complete before too long. My chapbook, Now Might as Well be Then was published by Finishing Line Press in 2009, the same year my husband passed away. That book is a bitter-sweet reminder.
photo by Michelle Keller

I enjoyed working with Leah Maines editor, and Kevin Maines at Finishing Line. I hope the publishing of my next book will go as well. 

Poets can run into some nightmares with publishers. A friend had her book accepted, but the press failed and after holding her manuscript a long time, the book was never published. Writers must research, carefully, and still one never knows what might happen. 

A novelist, Nancy O., published her book in the U.K. That company went out of business and stopped sending her checks, but the book continued to be listed on Amazon.com. She could not reach anyone to ask if her book was still selling and if so, why was she not receiving any revenue.

With self-publishing and print on demand (POD) becoming easier, some poets are doing their own thing. Some of our greatest poets, like Walt Whitman and T.S. Elliot, paid to publish an early book. The first book is often used to build a name for the poet if he has not already done so.

I believe that Karen Holmes has made a perfect match with her poetry and Kelsay Books.

With winter looming and the cold days that keep us inside, this is a good time to sort poems and to arrange short stories to see what I have and what might be worth sharing with others. Would you, my readers, have any interest in collections of my poems and stories?


Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Memories, from the corners of my mind

A Poem to celebrate an anniversary. On July 4th, 1963, I met the man I would marry.


The Walker Beach House

The house leans slightly toward the sea,
weathered silver by wind, rain and molten
streams of sunlight. The front porch stretching
north to south is furnished with a creaking
glider and two chairs that huddle and sag
like an old couple waiting for their sunset.

On the clothesline, two red towels flap
in a giddy summer folk dance. Precious
sea oats nod atop the tallest dunes.
I make my way along the narrow path between them
to the Atlantic lapping in eternal rhythm.
My artist mind brushes clouds on the horizon,
blending sky with the water's line.

I find you there sprawled on a blanket
smelling of coconut, defying the Big C
as you bake brown. My sandy foot nudges
yours and rasps you awake. We trudge
the path and shower by the porch.
After lunch we sleep together in Walker's bed. 

---Glenda Council Beall, from Now Might as Well Be Then, published by Finishing Line Press

Saturday, March 2, 2013

Local Writers will be interviewed on radio.


Recently Shawna Rose, hostess of the Blue Sky Show, called me to inquire about having local writers appear on her radio show.
I was on my way out of town and didn't get back to her until a week ago. Meantime, Brenda Kay Ledford, had contacted Shawna and is going to appear on the WJUL/WJRB FM Radio Station 97.5 at Young Harris, Georgia on Saturday,  March 2, 2013 at 11:30 am, 2:00 pm, and 7:30 pm.  The program, "Blue Sky Show," will also air on Sunday, March 3, 2013 at 7:30 am, 12:30 pm, and 2:00 pm. 

Shawna interviewed Brenda Kay about her new poetry chapbook, BECKONING, that was recently released by Finishing Line Press (www.finishinglinepress.com).

Maren Mitchell, author of Beat Chronic Pain, an Insider's Guide,  is expected to be a guest of Shawna Rose soon.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

ANOTHER POETRY BOOK

David Manning doesn't live in the Netwest region. He lives in Cary, N.C. where the NCWN Fall Conference will be held in November. He is one of the most prolific poets around. He has been winning awards in poetry since 1996.


His new poetry chapbook, Genes, can be ordered now for shipping by Finishing Line Press around January 4, 2013. The number of copies ordered before November 9, 2012 will determine the size of the press run, so please reserve your copy now. 

"Throughout Genes David Manning traces his family through a generation. People and places vanish but memory leaves a long trail...Here, language is so well-crafted it lifts each family member's story off the page..."---Gail Peck, author of Counting the Lost



David Treadway Manning, a California native, lives in Cary, North Carolina and was winner of the North Carolina Poetry Society's Poet Laureate Award in 1996, 1998 and 2006. Twice a Pushcart nominee, his poems have appeared in New Orleans Review, Southern Poetry Review, RATTLE, 32 Poems Magazine, Slipstream, Tar River Poetry and other journals.

His seven chapbooks include Out After Dark (2003), Detained by the Authorities (2007), and Light Sweet Crude (2009), all from Pudding House; The Ice-Carver, winner of the Longleaf Chapbook Competition in 2004, and, most recently, Continents of Light (Finishing Line Press, 2010). His full-length collection, The Flower Sermon, was a finalist in Main Street Rag's poetry book competition  in 2007. Yodeling Fungus, an excursion in comedy,  was released in 2010 from Old Mountain Press  in North Carolina.


_

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Folly Beach, Seventies, Walker House

Many years ago we spent some time at Folly Beach in Charleston, SC. We often stayed in an old beach house called the Walker House. The Walker family owned it, I suppose. The following poem was written from memories of when we were young, newly married, and we stayed there, but the image given is of two older people, the way we were when I wrote the poem.








The Walker Beach House

The house leans slightly toward the sea,
weathered silver by wind, rain and molten
streams of sunlight. The front porch stretching
north to south is furnished with a creaking
glider and two chairs that huddle and sag
like an old couple waiting for their sunset.

On the clothesline, two red towels flap
in a giddy summer folk dance. Precious
sea oats nod atop the tallest dunes.
I make my way along the narrow path between them
to the Atlantic lapping in eternal rhythm.
My artist mind brushes clouds on the horizon,
blending sky with the water’s line.

I find you there sprawled on a blanket
smelling of coconut, defying the Big C
as you bake brown. My sandy foot nudges
yours and rasps you awake. We trudge
the path and shower by the porch.
After lunch we sleep together in Walker's bed.





From Now Might as Well Be Then, Poetry by Glenda C. Beall, Finishing Line Press, 2009

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